Monthly Archives: February 2015



Back to  2011 I wrote about Isang Litrong Liwanag, a Filipino iniative to bring light to people living in the slums of Manila. Years laters, the project has grown, found partners and is expanding globally.

A liter of light, an update


We all need water and energy but with climate change, water scarcity is increasing. And sometimes, precious water is necessary to generate electricity. So for today’s post, I gathered a few infographics on that topic. 

Infographics on the water-energy nexus



The Kyoto Protocol entered into force ten years ago and it is reason to celebrate. To the official UNFCC website, ” Countries with targets under the Kyoto Protocol have collectively exceeded their original ambition early analysis shows. “

The Kyoto Protocol is a success. Really ?


For today’s post I have gathered latest news on a form of renewables we read too little about : marine energy. Given the astounding potential (240 GW by 2050), I believe it’s safe to say this will change as technologies mature. 

Marine energies are growing




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So fast, in fact that scientists studying the phenomenon are making new scales to adapt. As the Guardian reported last week , ” NOAA (the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration )  literally has to remake its graphs. “

Oceans are warming really fast



Obesity is the hidden elephant in the room. To a new study released by McKinsey, this costs two trillion dollars a year as 2.1 billion people globally are either overweight or obese. This is an epidemic, no less.

Obesity costs two trillion dollars a year




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I was tired of reporting how the situation is bad in Australia because of the current politicians running the country. So for today’s post here are some good news from Down Under as it is becoming a global solar leader.

Australia is home to a solar revolution


These are good news, according to Treehugger, tiger populations in India has been increasing by 58 percent since 2006. These are especially good news as the country is home to 70 percent of the world’s tiger populations.

Biodersity conservation measures do work